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15 Academic Words and Phrases to Use in Your Essay

Academic Words and Phrases

Writing an essay is not a child’s play. Students must ensure that they use the right words and phrases in their essays to score well. Certain words and phrases are considered academic and using them while writing an essay will help you achieve high. Below is a list of 15 academic words and phrases you can use in your Essay.

Providing a General Explanation

The word “general” describes something that is not specific or detailed but applies to many different things or people. For example, I am studying general psychology right now. (I am not studying any particular branch of psychology.)

Firstly, Secondly, Thirdly

Firstly, secondly, and thirdly is a widespread way of structuring an argument. It is also called a “list” structure. When you write in this structure, it is essential that the list items are short and can be easily recalled. This type of structure works well in both formal and informal texts. For example:

Firstly, I would like to state that this topic is fascinating. Secondly, I would like to say that this topic is crucial for our lives. Thirdly, I would like to say that this topic should be discussed widely by everyone so that we can have a better understanding of our world.

Therefore/As a Consequence

To show that something has been mentioned before and then continues with another idea. Example: Therefore, it is crucial to understand that ‘consequence’ can be used in many different ways.

For example:

“Therefore, I believe that he should be punished.”

“As a consequence, we need to do more research.”

Therefore/As a consequence is also used when one thing leads to another something happening. This way of using the word helps the writer explain his point more quickly, making his writing more concise.

In Contrast

In contrast to the above, we have “in contrast.” This word is used when you want to compare two or more things. For example, if you say that a person is tall and thin, we use the word “in contrast.”

In Other Words

In other words, it is a phrase that means “to rephrase something that you have just said using different words.” This is a helpful phrase when you want to repeat something that someone has said but with different wording.

  • In other words

In other words, it is a phrase that means “to put it differently.” It can be used as an adjective or adverb, sometimes in the same sentence. For example: “I’m tired today.” In other words, I’m tired today.”

  • In other words

In other words, it is used to explain something more clearly using another word or phrase. For example: “I’m going out with my friends tonight.” In other words, I’m going out with my friends tonight.”

  • In other words

In other words, it can mean “in conclusion” or “to summarize.” For example: “We need to go out for dinner tonight.”

In Order To

In order to be a phrase that is used as a preposition, an adverb, or an adjective. It means ‘so that’ or ‘in order to.’ It is used when someone requests something from someone else, or it can be used when someone explains why they did something or how they did something. For example: In order to complete my homework on time, I will study for three hours every night after dinner (the direct object). In order to be successful in life, you must work hard (the subject).

In Particular/For Instance

When you want to emphasize a specific thing or person. Example: I have a very tall brother. He is 6’8 inches tall. In particular/For instance: I have a very tall brother; for example, he is six feet eight inches tall.

These words can be used at the beginning of an essay to introduce a topic or idea that will be discussed later in the Essay. For example: In this Essay, we will discuss the importance of education in our lives and how it can benefit us financially and personally.

On the Other Hand

On the other hand, it is used as a phrase that expresses both sides of an argument or topic being discussed. It can be used to express positive and negative points about something and then change tone mid-sentence by adding another thought or idea: On the one hand, I like cake. On the other hand, I don’t want any more cake today.

It Can Be Argued

It can be argued that the world is facing many problems today. Some of these have been identified and explored in several books, such as novels, plays, poems, and movies. Others may not be as well known.

It can be argued that there does not need to be a direct translation between English and Spanish when using these words in their correct context as long as both parties understand what each other is trying to say.

Furthermore

It is used when the writer wants to emphasize a point. It is also used when we are referring to something else that is linked to what we are talking about. Furthermore, you can use this word as an adverb or adjective.

Furthermore, it can be used when the speaker wants to express something additional or additional information. Furthermore, for example, if someone is asked about their opinion on these issues, they might say, “I agree with you.” This can be seen as an example of using furthermore because it adds to what was said previously.

Having Said That

 Having said that, the word “having” is used in a sentence to mean “existence or being.”

When you use the word “having” to make a statement, you should be able to explain where and when this word applies. This is because there are so many different situations where it can be used. For example:

  • For example, when you’re talking about something that has happened recently, “I had lunch with my friends yesterday.”
  • For example, when you’re talking about something that existed before now, “I have been working at this company for three years.”
  • For example, when you’re talking about something that will happen later on, “I’m going to write a letter to my boss tomorrow morning.”

In View of; the Light of; Considering

The phrase “in view of” can be used to emphasize the importance of a particular thing. For example, if you are writing about a significant decision affecting many people, you can say, “In view of this, we have decided to postpone the meeting for a few more days.”

The phrase “in light of” is used when you want to emphasize what something means. For example, if someone asks you why they should study English and your answer is “It will help me get a job in America,” then instead of saying, “It will help me get a job in America,” it would be better to say “In light of my interest in English, I think it would be beneficial for me to study English.”

The phrase “considering” is used when you want to give extra information about something already mentioned in the sentence or paragraph. For example, considering my interests and desire for self-improvement, I think studying English is necessary.

According to X; X Stated that; Referring to the Views of X

Saying that something is “according to” someone else indirectly means that what they say is true. This is used when you can’t directly quote someone else’s exact words and want to credit them for what they’ve said. For example: “According to our research, the average American spends $8,000 on Christmas gifts.”

It’s common for anyone with opinions on a subject to express them in written form. You’re giving your personal statement if you say something about someone’s opinion. For example: “I disagree with her approach because she doesn’t consider all the factors involved.”

Moreover; Furthermore; in Addition, What’s more

Moreover: an adverb used to add emphasis to the preceding statement. In addition, it emphasizes that a person, thing, or quality is not the only one of its kind. Furthermore: An adverb that means “moreover” or “furthermore.” In addition, it can also be used to emphasize that something else is accurate or correct.

Furthermore: An adverb is used before a clause to introduce new information. In addition, it can also be used to emphasize the previous statement.

Moreover: an adverb used to add emphasis to the preceding statement. In addition, it emphasizes that a person, thing, or quality is not the only one of its kind. Furthermore: An adverb that means “moreover” or “furthermore.” In addition, it can also be used to emphasize that something else is accurate or correct. 

Furthermore: An adverb is used before a clause to introduce new information. In addition, it can also be used to emphasize the previous statement.

Despite This, Provided That; Nonetheless

This is also used when you are talking about something that will happen anyway. For example: “I am going to go out despite my hectic schedule.” This means that although it is something that you do not want to happen, it will still happen no matter what.

Provided that it is used when discussing something that cannot be denied. For example: “I am going to the party provided I finish my work on time.” It means that although there may be some doubts or problems with this thing, it will still happen if you do your best and get everything done.

Nonetheless, “Although I don’t want to do this in any way possible, I will still do it anyway.” Using this word means there is still a chance of success if you try hard enough. For example: “I am going to go out tonight nonetheless.” This means there is still a chance for success even though it may not work out as planned or desired at first glance.

Persuasive; Compelling

To be persuasive is to convince others of something using reason or emotion. It is not to persuade through force or intimidation. Persuasion can be accomplished through various channels, including direct dialogue, indirect communication (such as through a third party), and nonverbal communication (such as body language). 

Wrapping Up

When to use these words and phrases is beyond the scope of this blog. I believe it is up to you, the students, to use your learnings and share how you make these academic words and phrases work for you.

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